Our Library

Located in our office, SOCC cultivates an anti-racist library of novels, biographies, zines, graphic novels, children’s books and other literature around issues of race, racialization, colonization and feminism.

Our library is a resource for members and community members to use.

To check out a book, we have a self-serve manual sign out sheet in the office. To take out a book, please ask anyone in the office for assistance.

Also we are always taking suggestions for books to add to our library – please send any to socc@uvss.ca. We also accept donations of books, please leave them labelled in the SOCC office.

Please do stop by and check it out!

Some newly added works:

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence in Activist Communities – Ching-In Chen (Editor), Jai Dulani (Editor), and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Editor); Andrea Smith (preface)

The extent of the violence affecting our communities is staggering. Nearly one in three women in the United States will experience intimate violence in her lifetime. And while intimate violence affects relationships across the sexuality and gender spectrums, the likelihood of isolation and irreparable harm, including death, is even greater within LGBTQI communities. To effectively resist violence out there—in the prison system, on militarized borders, or during other clear encounters with “the system”—we must challenge how it is reproduced right where we live. It’s one thing when the perpetrator is the police, the state, or someone we don’t know. It’s quite another when that person is someone we call friend, lover, mentor, trusted ally. Based on the popular zine that had reviewers and fans alike demanding more, The Revolution Starts at Home finally breaks the dangerous silence surrounding the “open secret” of intimate violence—by and toward caretakers, in romantic partnerships, and in friendships—within social justice movements. This watershed collection compiles stories and strategies from survivors and their allies, documenting a decade of community accountability work and delving into the nitty-gritty of creating safety from abuse without relying on the prison industrial complex.
Fearless, tough-minded, and ultimately loving, The Revolution Starts at Home offers potentially life-saving alternatives for creating survivor safety while building a movement where no one is left behind.

Alego –Ningeokuluk Teevee

Written and illustrated by Ningeokuluk Teevee, one of the most interesting young artists in Cape Dorset, home to the great tradition of Inuit art, this is a beautifully simple story, written in Inuktitut and English, about a young Inuit girl who goes to the shore with her grandmother to collect clams for supper. Along the way she discovers tide pools brimming with life — a bright orange starfish, a creepy-crawly thing with many legs called an ugjunnaq, a hornshaped sea snail and a sculpin. This is an enchanting and utterly authentic introduction to the life of an Inuit child and her world.

Women of Colour and Feminism – Maythee Rojas

Author and professor Maythee Rojas offers a look at the intricate crossroads of being a woman of color. Women of Color and Feminism tackles the question of how women of color experience feminism, and how race and socioeconomics can alter this experience. Rojas explores the feminist woman of color’s identity and how it relates to mainstream culture and feminism. Featuring profiles of historical women of color (including Hottentot Venus, Josefa Loaiza, and Anna Mae Pictou-Aquash), a discussion of the arts, and a vision for developing a feminist movement built on love and community healing, Rojas examines the intersectional nature of being a woman of color and a feminist. Covering a range of topics, including sexuality, gender politics, violence, stereotypes, and reproductive rights, Women of Color and Feminism offers a far-reaching view of this multilayered identity.This powerful study strives to rewrite race and feminism, encouraging women to “take back the body” in a world of new activism. Women of Color and Feminism encourages a broad conversation about race, class, and gender and creates a discourse that brings together feminism and racial justice movements.

Belonging in an Adopted World – Barbara Yngvesson

Belonging in an Adopted World focuses on a central theme: the ways that transnational adoption contributes to projects of nation-building by countries that “send” and “receive” children in adoption. Drawing on anthropologist Arturo Escobar’s (1995) understanding of development discourse as a “secular theory of salvation,” the first paragraph argues that narratives of rescue underpinning policies of transnational adoption can be mapped onto development theories of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s that positioned the developing world as “a child in need of guidance.” In this sense, transnational adoption can be understood as one of the forms and practices of modernization through which the relations of First and Third Worlds took shape in the second half of the twentieth century.

I Mix What I Like! – A Mixtape Manifesto – Jared Ball

In a moment of increasing corporate control in the music industry, where three major labels call the shots on which artists are heard and seen, Jared Ball analyzes the colonization and control of popular music and posits the homemade hip-hop mixtape as an emancipatory tool for community resistance. I Mix What I Like! is a revolutionary investigation of the cultural dimension of anti-racist organizing in the Black community. Blending together elements from internal colonialism theory, cultural studies, political science, and his own experience on the mic, Jared positions the so-called “hip-hop nation” as an extension of the internal colony that is modern African America, and suggests that the low-tech hip-hop mixtape may be one of the best weapons we have against Empire.

Lost and Found – Shaun Tan

A girl finds a bright spot in a dark world. A boy leads a strange, lost creature home. And a group of peaceful creatures cedes their home to cruel invaders. Shaun Tan, with his understated voice and brilliant draftsmanship proved that he has a unique imaginative window to our souls, and an unparalleled ability to share that opening with pictures and narratives that are as unexpected as they are deeply true.Originally published in Australia, these three beloved and acclaimed tales were never widely available in the U.S. Now for the first time, The Red TreeThe Lost Thing, and the John Marsden classic The Rabbits are presented in their entirety with additional new artwork and authors’ notes. Together they tell a tale that will leave no reader unmoved, about how we lose and find what matters most to us.

The Rabbits is the final story in Lost & Found.  It’s a story about the colonization of Australia, and also, Shaun helpfully informs us in the afterword, a story about environmentalism and consumerism.

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